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Young People With Disabilities Increasingly Entering Nursing Homes

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The number of young adults moving into nursing homes is on the rise and advocates say the reason could be a lack of resources available for people to stay in the community.

Individuals ages 31 to 64 account for 14 percent of nursing home residents today, federal data indicates. Ten years ago, this group made up just 10 percent.

While it’s uncertain precisely why this uptick is occurring, the trend is likely the result of limited resources to help people with developmental disabilities, mental health needs and other concerns stay in their homes. Even as funds for home-based care have increased in many states, the need for assistance is rising faster, experts say.

Ultimately, states are required to foot the bill for nursing homes, but don’t have to provide in-home assistance, leaving many people with disabilities few options. This, even though the Supreme Court determined more than 10 years ago in Olmstead v. L.C. that people with disabilities should have the option to live in the community whenever possible, reports NPR. To read more click here.

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Comments (2 Responses)

  1. milbla says:

    I’m interested in learning if there are assistive living facilities that can be purchased or obtained i.e. elderly, for multihandicapped individuals who require a full time caregiver? If so, details and locations, please.

  2. Sandra Parker says:

    I’m looking for a nursing home for my daughter, she is 45, that is for adults with disabilities specifically. I have Parkinsens disease and will not be able to care for her soon. Thank you for your reply

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