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Lady Gaga Takes Heat For ‘Retarded’ Comment

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Pop star Lady Gaga is apologizing after using the word “retarded” in a magazine interview published this week.

The singer got flack from a number of advocacy groups for using the word, which many in the disability community have fought to remove from the vernacular arguing that it’s offensive to those with intellectual disabilities.

“I’ve written loads of music. Why would I try to put out a song and think I’m getting one over on everybody? That’s retarded,” Lady Gaga said as she defended herself against accusations of plagiarism during the interview with NME, a British music magazine.

The singer, whose real name is Stefani Germanotta, quickly issued a statement of apology that appeared on PerezHilton.com.

“I consider it part of my life’s work and music to push the boundaries of love and acceptance. My apologies for not speaking thoughtfully. To anyone that was hurt, please know that it was furiously unintentional,” she said.

Lady Gaga is not the first public figure to ruffle feathers by using the r-word. In recent years, Jennifer Aniston, Sarah Silverman, Rush Limbaugh and former White House Chief of Staff Rahm Emanuel have been criticized for using the term.

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Comments (8 Responses)

  1. debrarae says:

    It is because of the fact, that celebrities and politicians are seldom held accountable for discriminating against the special needs community; that this type of hatred will continue to occur. The so called ‘apology’ is ‘hardly sincere’.

  2. jwalling says:

    Why do we care so much what celebrities say? It was not even directed at a person and that term has very recently been removed from vocabulary. I would encourage others to not spend their time and energy being ‘offended’ by celebrities, especially Lady Gaga, for goodness sake!!!

  3. CinTaylor says:

    I think we should care because celebrities often influence what people do, how they act and how they speak. When a celebrity or politician slips or purposely uses that word or otherwise puts down people with disabilities and people react negatively, it can be a great way to raise awareness of the issue. And even when their sincere apologies are not really all that sincere, I think it still helps to chip away at the problem.

  4. pattyrocks says:

    Though politicians and celebrities have apologized over their “slips of the tongue,” this will undoubtedly happen again; human nature is human nature. But we can and do learn from our mistakes – so there is hope.

  5. NotokayDsala says:

    Please help our grassroots cause to stop celebrities from using “us” to promote their careers. Funny how many of these people offend then apologize. Next thing you know they are being promoted by the very people they have attacked. Do they think we don’t see right through them. Shame on organizations for promoting their careers. Down syndrome Assoc of Los Angeles used Sarah Silverman AND Dana Gould last year at a fundraiser. They said they educated them. NOT SO. Silverman and Gould now listed as “friends” at their TwentyWonder event have continued to spew their hate. Tell the organizations to stop promoting the careers of these people. At least Lady Gaga apologized. Siverman, Gould, Aniston… they could care less… proving they devalue the lives of people with intellectual disabilities. Join us on Facebook and tell DSALA it is NOT OKAY!!!

  6. jwalling says:

    True, but how about all the other disgusting, revolting, and offensive things she does? Is her song “Judas” offensive to millions of Christians? It doesn’t get reported or “called out” requiring her to apologize or retract what she said. I think that if we are going to “hold celebrities accountable because they influence others”, than there are far more serious issues with Gaga!!

  7. TRENA D. WADE says:

    YES WHEN CELBS USE THE “R” WORD IT SETS A BAD EXAMPLE, BUT ITS NOT THE END OF THE WORLD, ITS NOT LIKE SHE WAS (LIKE THAT POLITITION RECENTLY) ENCOURAGING PEOPLE TO TO THINK THAT THE WORLD WOULD BE A BETTER PLACE IF SOME ONE JUST KILLED US ALL. HE NEEDED TO BE TOLD AND TOLD STRONGLY THAT HIS VEIWS WERE IMMORAL, UNETHICAL AND WRONG. WHICH HE WAS. IN MY PERCEPTION THIS IS A MINOR EPISODE AND SHOULD BE TREATED LIKE ONE. IT DOSE REMIND US THAT WE NEED TO CONTINUE TO EDUCATE PEOPLE (EXPECIALLY THE MEDIA) ABOUT THE PROBLEM AND REMIND THEM THAT THEY SHOULD NOT USE IT JUST TO CREAT DRAMA. BUT THE BEST WAY TO FIX THE PROBLEM IS TO CHANGE PEOPLES PERCEPTION OF THE PEOPLE SO LABLED.
    WE DO THIS BY SETTING GOOD EXAMPLES, AND SHOWING PEOPLE THAT WE ARE MORE THAN JUST THE “R”LABLES WE WERE GIVEN AS KIDS. I KNOW I AM NOT PERFECT AND WHEN I AM HONEST WITH MYSELF I KNOW I NEED PEOPLE TO BE WILLING TO FORGIVE ME WHEN I MAKE A MISTAKE, IF I AM NOT WILLING TO FORGIVE OTHERS HOW CAN I EXPECT PEOPLE TO FORGIVE ME?

  8. Unitedmedia says:

    Wasn’t that an apology with a “but”. It makes it better because it wasn’t intentional to hurt. I think that makes it worse.

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